There are endless platforms for video marketing. YouTube, broadcast television, video boards and street marketing, you name it. The possibilities are endless. With a smartphone, consumers can access online video anytime, anywhere. The same is not true with traditional, paper marketing. With video, you can reach your audience wherever they are in a cost-effective way.

Perhaps nothing is as effective and efficient in spreading your message as a viral. The idea behind viral is to inspire people to spread your message for you. It’s been estimated that a successful viral can have 500-1000 times more impact than a non-viral campaign. Crafting a successful viral marketing campaign is hard. But here’s some ABCs that may help…
Among the first to write about viral marketing on the Internet was the media critic Doug Rushkoff.[16] The assumption is that if such an advertisement reaches a "susceptible" user, that user becomes "infected" (i.e., accepts the idea) and shares the idea with others "infecting them", in the viral analogy's terms. As long as each infected user shares the idea with more than one susceptible user on average (i.e., the basic reproductive rate is greater than one—the standard in epidemiology for qualifying something as an epidemic), the number of infected users grows according to an exponential curve. Of course, the marketing campaign may be successful even if the message spreads more slowly, if this user-to-user sharing is sustained by other forms of marketing communications, such as public relations or advertising.[citation needed]
Dropbox, a leading online file storage company implemented a referral marketing program for its subscribers in 2009. In referral marketing program, those who signed up and those who referred got free space. Within a year, referral accounted for more than 35% of the new business for Dropbox. There are several examples from industry all over the world that have employed referral marketing –AT&T gives customers an opportunity to earn up to $575 per year through referrals.
A new energy drink company, for example, could create an Internet video featuring a person who consumes the energy drink before performing a seemingly impossible bicycle jump. If the video is made to look real, it may encourage people who see it to share it with others. After the video receives enough views, the company could reveal its true purpose, convincing its viewers to seek out more information about the drink without ever using a traditional advertisement.
Many customers may not be willing to take part in referral marketing program simply because they don’t know how the personal details collected will be used by the company. It is better to build rapport with the company by asking them to rate your product or subscribe to newsletters. Before announcing the referral marketing program, privacy clauses and confidentiality clauses should be communicated to them so that they feel confident about referring people to you.
Want people to notice you? Do something completely unexpected. Don’t try to promote your product and make it look cool—everyone does that. Remember the “Will it Blend?” YouTube campaign by Blendtec? Their videos became popular not because of their blender, but because of what their blender was capable of blending—namely iPhones, marbles and other unexpected stuff.

"Just wanted to say thanks for all the link-building, help, tips and etc that you guys do for me and my site. I greatly appreciate it. My father and I went out to dinner last night and toasted you all. Why? Not only are you nice people, but now our site ranks well for several competitive phrases... If any of you are there (Pubcon conference) as well, I'm buying a round and I hope your livers are in shape. Hope to meet several of you in person." Subbu A.


Want people to notice you? Do something completely unexpected. Don’t try to promote your product and make it look cool—everyone does that. Remember the “Will it Blend?” YouTube campaign by Blendtec? Their videos became popular not because of their blender, but because of what their blender was capable of blending—namely iPhones, marbles and other unexpected stuff.
^ Semenov, Alexander; Alexander Nikolaev; Alexander Veremyev; Vladimir Boginski; Eduardo Pasiliao (2016). Analysis of Viral Advertisement Re-Posting Activity in Social Media. Computational Social Networks. CSoNet 2016. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol 9795. Lecture Notes in Computer Science. 9795. pp. 123–134. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-42345-6_11. ISBN 978-3-319-42344-9.
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